Heat Treated Glass

Heat Treated Glass

Heat treating is a process that imparts additional strength to flat glass products. Heating and cooling cycles are carefully controlled to produce Heat Strengthened or Fully Tempered glass. Heat strengthened glass is twice as strong as annealed glass but retains the same breakage characteristics. Defined by ASTM C 1048 to have a surface compression between 7500 and 3500, Heat Strengthened glass is not considered a safety glazing material. Heat Strengthened glass is the preferred process to resist thermal stress and provide additional load resistance when needed.

Fully tempered glass is four times stronger than annealed glass and is considered a safety glazing material. The strength imparted in the tempering process dramatically increases the ability of fully tempered glass to resist bending forces. The heat treating process does not change the rigidity or deflection characteristics of glass. The very high strain induced in the quenching process will cause the glass to fragment into innumerable small fragments. The small fragments are rough, sharp, and may interlock. With little structural integrity the majority of the glass often vacates the opening. The design professional should consider the location and proximity of populated areas below fully tempered glazing. The resulting debris from fallout can cause serious injury. Areas of high risk can usually be accommodated with laminated construction to meet code.

Trulite safety glazing products are permanently marked with a logo. This is a trademark of our organization and it represents our commitment to quality assurance. The logo is also indicates certification of conformance to both ANSI Z 97.1 – 2004 and CPSC 16 CFR 1201.